Saturday, October 22, 2016

BLACK AMERICAN MASCULINITY SHOWCASED IN "MOONLIGHT"


FEELING REBLOGGY

Headline

‘Moonlight’: Is This the Year’s Best Movie?

To describe “Moonlight,” Barry Jenkins’s second feature, as a movie about growing up poor, black and gay would be accurate enough...But those classifications are also inadequate, so much as to be downright misleading.



It would be truer to the mood and spirit of this breathtaking film to say that it’s about teaching a child to swim, about cooking a meal for an old friend, about the feeling of sand on skin and the sound of waves on a darkened beach, about first kisses and lingering regrets.
Based on the play “In Moonlight Black Boys Look Blue” by Tarell Alvin McCraney, “Moonlight” is both a disarmingly, at times almost unbearably personal film and an urgent social document, a hard look at American reality and a poem written in light, music and vivid human faces.


The stanzas consist of three chapters in the life of Chiron, played as a wide-eyed boy by Alex Hibbert, as a brooding adolescent by Ashton Sanders and as a mostly grown man by Trevante Rhodes. The nature and meaning of manhood is one of Mr. Jenkins’s chief concerns. How tough are you supposed to be? How cruel? How tender? How brave? And how are you supposed to learn?
~NY TIMES

This movie is getting excellent reviews. I'm looking forward to seeing it as soon as I can. For other women also thinking about seeing this movie, I think a good prequel to watching "Moonlight" might be the documentary, The Mask You Live In  available on Netflix. America, and therefore American Masculinity, is the box within which Black American Masculinity is shaped. 


Read More: 
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/21/movies/moonlight-review.html?_r=0

Read More: 

   Headline

DIRECTOR BARRY JENKINS, PLAYWRIGHT TARELL ALVIN MCCRANEY & THE MEN OF ‘MOONLIGHT’ TALK REDEFINING BLACK MALE IDENTITY IN FILM NARRATIVES



http://shadowandact.com/2016/10/21/director-barry-jenkins-playwright-tarell-alvin-mccraney-the-men-of-moonlight-talk-redefining-black-male-identity-in-film-narratives/